Friday, December 28, 2012

Happy Holidays from the Washburns!

Hope everyone is getting lots of good loot and plenty of quality family time this holiday season. Here is our family Christmas card from us to you!


We always incorporate our pets and daughter Olivia into our cards. I'll have to dig up all the older cards and post 'em here as a collection some time.

Gonna have lots of great Evan Yeti developments in 2013. Including the second printed book, the toy, a game, and a gallery show! More news on all that sweet stuff as we progress.

Thanks so much for reading and being a part of our Evan Yeti family! We appreciate all your support, comments and recommendations. 

Happy Holidays and a prosperous new year!

-the Washburn family

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: nemu*nemu interview

It must cost a fortune to feed these stuffed animals! Creator Audra Furuichi's Stuffed pups come to life and star in her webcomic nemu*nemu!



1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

nemu*nemu is an all-ages online comic that I've been growing for about 7 years now. The two stuffed pups, Anpan (red scarf) and Nemu (yellow kerchief), are the stars of the show. With a little magic, they come to life and curiously explore our world -- one adventure at a time. Sometimes the adventures are real, other times they are "imagined". The nemu*nemu universe expanded over the past couple years to include Enchilada, a space-time traveling pup from another dimension, and Blue, a pup who lives in a Lost & Found box -- drawn specifically for our local newspaper, the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I currently use Manga Studio EX4 for layout and inks and Photoshop CS5 for colors. Earlier on, many of the strips were done on bristol board with ink, scanned in and toned/colored in Photoshop.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

I'm a big manga fan -- artists like Kiyohiko Azuma (Azumanga Daioh, Yotsuba&!) and Kaoru Mori (Emma, Bride's Story) are my current biggest influences. Also, I love just about anything done by GURIHIRU (Avatar comics, Power Pack for Marvel), Hayao Miyazaki (just about anything Studio Ghibli), Mamoru Hosoda (Summer Wars, Wolf Children Yuki & Ame). Funny you mention toys though -- I've been following the Good Smile company's english blog that highlights their latest releases. I check out their designs for cute inspiration from time to time! (http://mikatan.goodsmile.info/en/)

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

The pups are based on real stuffed pups that Scott gave me when we first started dating. The "Anpan" character came first, then we looked for a second pups and that turned out to be "Nemu". The third was "Enchilada" and the fourth, who was incidentally from a lost & found where Scott works, is "Blue". (Yes, they are all the same model of stuffed pup and we can tell them apart -- just like how you can tell our four pups apart!) The girls are extreme ends of my personality, but look like a couple of my friends from my late high school/college years.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

Just Scott. He does all the voices anyway. XD

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Can't think of anything off the top of my head?

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

For my pups to become household names. No, really! :3

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

In some ways, it's been very satisfying. I like being creative and I enjoy drawing the comic. However, handling the business side of things has not been easy and in many ways I'm still learning things as I go.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

Locally (here in Hawaii), we do events like Christmas craft fairs/shows and Kawaii Kon in the spring. Every so often, I do library or school talks. I've also done a number of west coast events over the years (Fanime, SDCC) and a couple east coast shows (TCAF, NEWW2). Occasionally we advertise on fellow webcomic sites and I post to various social networks like Tumblr, Facebook, etc.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

I enjoy the process more than anything else. I like to think that with each and every strip I complete, I learn something new or challenge myself to improve artistically and creatively. It's hard work, but satisfying.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

Aside from Blue Hawaii that runs in the Star-Advertiser, just planning out future stories, my new year's illustration, and some new merchandise for the spring season. :D

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Be true to yourself and believe the work you do is good -- then put it out there! 





Thanks Audra! The plushy pups in your nemu*shop are awesome! And thanks for sharing the Good Smile link. There's some sweet stuff there! :)

If you dig nemu*nemu you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps nemu*nemu on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading. Let us know what you think with a comment below. Then bring some snacks and an appetite for adventure to nemu*nemu!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Crunchy Bunches interview

Fill your eyes with sugary goodness! Creator Scott Warren invites us to the breakfast table to talk about his webcomic Crunchy Bunches!


1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

Crunchy Bunches is a kid's breakfast cereal, and like any good cereal it has a mascot. That mascot is Munchy, the enthusiastic and slightly obsessive yellow guy with one big tooth. The comic follows him and his friends as they travel the world searching for new flavors or marshmallow shapes, or just defending their headquarters, The Crunch House, from the nefarious Growlies who only want to spread hunger at the breakfast table.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I make everything digitally using mainly Flash, and sometimes Painter (for the occasional painted background). I know Flash is an unusual choice for a comic, but I'm familiar with it, and I like the way it's brush tool works. I have recently been contemplating using Manga Studio, however.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Duck Tales, Calvin and Hobbes, Pogo, Adventure Time, older Simpsons, Rocky and Bullwinkle, Scott Pilgrim, Ren & Stimpy, Rocko’s Modern Life, Mario games, Powerpuff Girls, Transformers toys, Scott Morse, Kazu Kibuishi, Katie Rice, Chris Sanders, Ben Caldwell, Brad Bird, Michel Gagné, Bruce Timm, Tex Avery, Stephen Silver, and of course lots of old animated cereal commercials.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

For the most part, no, but I do have specific friends that I’ll think of when I can’t otherwise figure out how a particular character might act. I often keep the personalities of my characters very simple at first and let them evolve during the story. So it’s not that I based those characters on people, but that the characters ended up reminding me of those friends after awhile, and I just go with it from there.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I would definitely want Crunchy Bunches to be an animated movie, and Billy West could do a great Munchy.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

You know, I haven’t really thought about that before. I’ve always like the soundtracks to the Peanuts movies, so maybe some classy piano jazz. Maybe some chiptunes too. Maybe even some piano-jazz-chiptune-fusion? I don’t even know if that would work, though…

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

Not much really, I just want to create something that my brain imagined. It’s just really fun and satisfying to do that, and I get kind of antsy when I don’t for a long time.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

I think I’ve had to learn time management better than before! I still work a full-time job in addition to this, so I have to find time after work and weekends to make a new comic each week. But beyond that, I feel like it gives me a better outlet for creativity then most projects I’ve done, and keeps me thirsty for inspiration and motivated to keep drawing.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I’ve used Project Wonderful, which is great. They should call it Project Great, it’s so great. It’s wonderful how great it is. Uh, but other than that, I’ll often post a link to /r/comics on Reddit or tweet something out on Twitter. Tumblr is nice too, it’s always great to have a comic of mine reblogged. I also keep a Facebook page for the comic updated regularly.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

I guess I just really enjoy it. I love drawing, designing characters and worlds, telling stories with those characters, everything involved in making a comic. It is hard to keep up sometimes, but I’ve honestly surprised myself with how much I still look forward to making Crunchy Bunches, even after a year of doing it.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I sometimes dabble in game design. I love video games, especially indie games and I’ve had a lot of fun messing around in Game Maker 7. I put up the games I’ve made at www.flipskip.com , most of which are pretty short and unpolished.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Dive right in and start making stuff. Know that it’ll probably be bad at first if you’re new to it, that’s okay, you will get better. Remember K.I.S.S. (keep it simple, stupid). Have fun.  





Thanks for taking the time Scott! I love making games too! Mostly music and sprite animation. Programming... not so much. I'm going to try my hand at GameSalad. Perhaps a colab...?

If you dig Crunchy Bunches you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Crunchy Bunches on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks for reading folks. Drop us a comment to let us know what you think. Then pour yourself a heaping helping ofCrunchy Bunches!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Shadowbinders interview

How do you balance your life in two realities? Artist Thom Pratt and Writer Kambrea Pratt introduce us to the world of  Shadowbinders!


1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

A hapless teenaged girl inherits a magic ring that transports her to another world. There, she runs across an arrogant, brash mage onboard his airship, The True North. Adventure, Fantasy... and a little romantic comedy... ensues.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I've been all over the place with it. I (Thom) started out drawing in pencil, then scanning it in and coloring in Photoshop. Then I started drawing it completely in Photoshop, first with a Bamboo (painful!) then a Lenovo Thinkpad. When the Lenovo died a horrific death over the summer, I bought a 19" Yiynova tablet to replace it. But guess what? Yiynova DOES NOT PLAY WELL with Photoshop. So I switched to Illustudio, which is a Japanese program that's made by the same people who make Manga Studio... but has much better coloring tools. Confused yet?

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

So many... Last Exile, Inuyasha, Howl's Moving Castle, Stardust... anime in general. Star Wars, The Princess Bride... even Doctor Who. It's a mishmash of the things we like.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Yep. Inadvertently....Mia ended up being a lot like Kam and Rhen ended up acting like Thom was in high school. Some of the characters are named after family or friends -- but personality-wise, not so much.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

That's hard. We've thought about this before. I (Thom) always pictured Rhen sounding like Carey Elwes. I think of Ellen Page for Mia. Winston would definitely be voiced by Rob Paulsen. Kam probably has other ideas.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

We're working on that right now, actually: http://bit.ly/SBMixtape

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

Eventually we'd like to be able to do comics full-time, even if it's not 100% Shadowbinders.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

What life? Seriously... the social life goes away. The video games go away. The TV watching goes away. That's the tradeoff.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

What *don't* we do? We like to experiment and have tried some off-the-wall stuff. People point out the contests, etc. Really, we just see what we can get to stick. Everyone's mileage will vary.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Because we feel that someday it will be bigger and justify the time and money invested. That, and we are masochists.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

Yes, there are other comics projects in the works, as well as a novelization of Shadowbinders. Can't talk about it any more right now. Sorry. ;)

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Just do it. You can only plan so much, and so much will happen that's completely unplanned. You'll learn by doing.  





No social life or TV i can agree with. But no video games is where I draw the line. :) Thanks so much for taking time out for our interview!

If you dig Shadowbinders you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Shadowbinders on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading. let us know how you feel with a comment below. Then wake up and find yourself at Shadowbinders!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: The Ghost Engine interview

It's hard to concentrate with a ghost in your brain! Writer Danny Djeljosevic and Artist Eric Zawadzki team up to discuss their webcomic  The Ghost Engine!



1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

Danny: The Ghost Engine follows a supercool art thief named Becky Chapel, an uncouth ex-reality TV bounty hunter named Geoffrey Price, and the 19th century ghosts that live inside their heads. Becky shares a brain with William Bark, a steadfast English secret agent who investigated the paranormal for the Queen, while a fairly sinister Russian occultist named Grigori Mikhailovich Zimyatov occupies Price's headspace.

That clustercuss of mismatched personalities relates to this huge machine in the French Catacombs called The Ghost Engine that's capable of opening portals to the spirit world -- provided you have enough living beings to fuel it. The last time our heroes were forced to rebuild the thing and turn it on, a giant monster emerged and bunch of people died. Now Becky and Price are under the custody of a secret US agency called MAESTRO that's been taking part in ongoing -- and thus far, abortive -- attempts to explore the afterlife. Now MAESTRO wants to turn the Ghost Engine back on again as a last ditch attempt to actually accomplish something. As of my writing this, a giant creature has burst out of the portal, so yeah, it's not going very well.

It sounds incredibly high-concept, but we spend a lot of time developing the characters and going into their backstories and figuring out just what makes our heroes the way they are. It's got action. It's got pathos. It's got jokes. It's got amazing art from Eric.

Eric: What he said.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

Danny: For writing comics, WriteRoom is usually my jam -- it takes over the entire screen so that you can't easily click away to Facebook or whatever. It also makes your screen look like some old school DOS computer if you change the font and page settings right. As a word processing program, it's pretty bare bones compared to Word or OpenOffice, so if you're the kind of person who needs extreme amounts of organizational stuff to keep you in line, I'd probably recommend Final Draft or Scrivener (which I've got on my computer but haven't tried out yet).

In the physical world, I use unlined note cards for sketches and page layout thumbnails. And, of course, a pen.

Eric: I primarily use a Cintiq and Photoshop. I do everything on it. Roughs, illustrating, colouring and lettering on Photoshop. I'm told that it's better to do the lettering in Illustrator, but I like the all-in-one aspect of Photoshop and I tend to letter first so that I can tailor my layouts to it all. (I make adjustments while I go, though)

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Danny: Besides everything I've ever read, watched, played with, gazed at or idolized? Let's see... there's likely some Grant Morrison and Warren Ellis in everything I do. This one's probably more Ellis than Moz. We started working on this comic in 2009, which was the summer I got obsessed with Fraction/Bá/Moon's Casanova. That one really opened my eyes to making comics with a clear authorial voice that actually intend to be comics instead of something that reads like a movie pitch.

Eric: I'm also a big fan of Casanova. Those guys are crafting a masterpiece. I'm inspired by a lot of creators so my answer changes every day. I'll read anything by Brian Wood and Joshua Dysart. Olivier Coipel is one of favourite working artists. R.M. Guerra, Frank Quitely, Ryan Sook, Stuart Immonen... a lot of these guys clearly don't do work that doesn't looks anything like my stuff, but they inspire me quite a bit.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Danny: Nah.

Eric: Nope.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

Danny: Y'know, I've never really thought about it. I rarely consider stuff like that when I make comics, which prolly stems from my "this is a comic, not a movie" thing. Occasionally I've been inspired by a specific actor when writing a character, but I never think about who'd play them in movies.

But since you asked...

I imagine the Ghost Engine movie -- co-directed by Ryuhei Kitamura and Harmony Korine in a blatant cash grab to help fund his backwoods erotic thriller with Joaquin Phoenix and Lindsay Lohan -- would feature Matthew McConaughey hitting Magic Mike levels of sleaziness as Price. His ghost, Zimyatov, would be played by either Daniel Craig or Liev Schreiber -- whichever one can do a better Russian accent. Mustache required.

As for Becky, Gillian Jacobs of Community or Anna Kendrick would fit the role pretty well, but I'm also biased because I'm in love with them. William Bark would be played by, I dunno, that guy from Sherlock, Benedict Pumpkinpatch? Or one of those young lads who played The Doctor. Someone weird looking, British and easily befuddled. Mustache also required.

I'd populate the rest of the movie with Elias Koteas leading a cast of under-appreciated character actors and guys from The Wire. Josh Charles would finally play a role where he doesn't betray the team. The Ghost Engine itself would be played by WWE Superstar John Cena.

Eric: Hah! Everything Danny just said would make for an absolutely perfect movie translation!

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Danny: Metric's album Old World Underground, Where Are You Now? is pretty much Becky Chapel in audio form. Price's soundtrack is probably Mountain Goats, though I doubt he himself listens to them. For the rest of the comic... let's go with electropop. Anytime the Ghost Engine gets activated the soundtrack is Dan Deacon and that time Dan Deacon layered "Call Me Maybe" 147 times.

Eric: Any score from John Powell works for me.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

Danny: Tell an entertaining story that only we could tell, build an audience, have something we can show people to prove our skills and hopefully get other gigs by virtue of being able to create comics that look good and read well. Like anything I do, it's a desperate cry for attention.

Eric: Yeah, basically we're just trying get an audience. I don't think we have any illusions of profiting on The Ghost Engine. We're just trying to have fun and build ourselves up a bit, show the world what we can do. And of course get better at what we do. I'm always running towards that 10,000 hours goal.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

Danny: For one thing solid proof that I'm a guy who makes comics, which I now tell people without having to mitigate it with "Well, I'm still looking for artists so I have nothing to show for it now..." And it's made me realize I need to work on my pitching skills. This one time a pro I'm pseudo-friends with asked me what The Ghost Engine was about I stumbled and stuttered my way through an incoherent plot summary. Never again, I said.

Eric: Well, some of my friends joke that I have no life because I'm always drawing. But I figure I should only really be concerned when there's no one left to make that joke. Hah!

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

Danny: We got the social media game on lock -- new pages come out every Monday and Friday, and I put the word out through Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, MySpace, Friendster, Faceparty, Face the Jury, OkCupid, JDate -- what was that comic book social networking site that was popular for five minutes? ComicSpace? I don't post anything on there. I give out business cards for The Ghost Engine at conventions to anyone I think is cool. We're also on sites like ComicRocket and Just the First Frame. Then there's Project Wonderful, but I'll let Eric talk about that one.

Eric: I put about $20 a week in to Project Wonderful over the course a month a little while ago and our stats jumped through the roof. Unfortunately, I couldn't really keep that up because I'm not made of money. We're basically just using social media and word of mouth these days.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Danny: In the year 2012, it's the only game in town, isn't it? Self-publishing physical comics isn't exactly sustainable anymore, but there's an entire Internet to put up your stuff at a minimal cost and get it in front of people's eyes. Comics is a world where talent outnumbers jobs, and one of the only ways to prove your chops is to put out a comic yourself. Anyway, like everyone who makes comics, you do it because it's in your blood and you can't do anything else anyway.

Eric: I'm going to make comics no matter what. It just so happens that Web Comics ensures the widest possible audience. If we were to sell $1 PDFs, I'm sure we'd make about $20 after a year and we'd have a tiny audience. Web comics ensures a bigger audience and that's all we're really after right now.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

Danny: Let's see... the other artist I regularly work with is Mike Prezzato. Together we do a lot of lo-fi "Kirby meets 2000 AD" style garage comics. The collaboration I always show to people is our short "Sgt. Death and his Metachromatic Men" which is basically a war comic pilot where a bunch of robots fight a dinosaur. I'm actually working on coloring (or, in some cases, recoloring) our previous collabos with some old school simple Photoshop spot coloring to make our stuff pop in weird psychedlic hues. I got a thing for pre-digital comics coloring.

I'm also Co-Managing Editor of Comics Bulletin, one of the older still-functioning comics websites on the Internet. And, at this point, probably the coolest. I write about cool comics, the latest movies and bring on writers who are prone to making indie music references.

Otherwise, Eric and I are doing preliminary stuff on our next big comic project. Too early to talk about it, but it's the biggest thing I've ever written.

Eric: I'm working with a couple of different writers on various shorts and long form projects. I've got a short with Ed Brisson (of Murder Book and Comicback fame) up on Challenger Comics.. I did an Occupy Comics short with Patrick Meaney (known for his comics based documentaries) and we're working on something else at the moment. I've got some things brewing with Ryan K. Lindsay and of course, there's the previously mentioned follow-up project to The Ghost Engine with Danny.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Danny: Make comics. Just make them. Make them however you can. Nobody's impressed with the guy at the comic shop telling his friends about his awesome idea for a Heroes for Hire book. Comics are the visual medium with the lowest barrier to entry. There's no such thing as an "aspiring creator" -- just people who make comics and people who don't. You keep at it, get better, make sure people know about you, and you'll be fine.

Eric: Yup, just go out and do it. Put as many hours into it as you can and you'll just get better and better. Also make a lot of friends who are at the same level as you in the industry. Work with as many people as you can. Eventually, one of those friends is going to hit it big and suddenly you'll be connected. And, of course, that only works if you're not an asshole. So basically just be a nice person to everyone and try not take anything personally.  





Sounds like you guys are keeping crazy busy. Thanks so much for taking the time!

If you dig The Ghost Engine you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps The Ghost Engine on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks for reading.Drop us a comment to lest us know what you think. Then follow that voice in your head to The Ghost Engine!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: The Pride of Life interview

From adolescence to untold power! Creator Rhandi Fisher makes us wise to  The Pride of Life!




1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

The Pride of Life is mostly a coming-of-age adventure story in a low-fantasy setting. It follows the misadventures of Kedamono--a scrawny, somewhat eccentric teen who belongs to a race of dog-like people--who, after eating a legendary fruit, gains a powerful new body along with superpowers. He ends up discovering that his new abilities are more of a hindrance than a help, and end up causing him more problems than he ever bargained for.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

In the beginning, PoL was strictly pen and paper, but these days, it is digitally created in its entirety, drawn in Photoshop CS5 using a Wacom Cintiq. I personally care more about being able to produce work more quickly without sacrificing quality, and don't like having a ton of drawings hanging around, so the latter method suites me just fine.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Early on, PoL was pretty heavily influenced by anime and shonen manga (particularly Dragon Ball Z), It's pretty apparent in the first two books, but the tone has since shifted away from that. If I had to name inspiration, it would probably come from the adventure stylings of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comics (Archie Adventure run) and Jeff Smith's "Bone".

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

None in particular, but Kedamono is the most like my goofier myself.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

The only ones that really stands out are Johnny Yong Bosch (Vash the Stampede in "Trigun") for the role of Kedamono, and David Brimmer (Sunshine in "Ultimate Muscle: The Kinnikuman Legacy") for the role of "Daddy" Valdez.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

If it could actually work, I wouldn't mind some funk/jazz fusion for some general overworld themes, and classical for the darker scenes.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

Mainly just to finish it!

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

Well, since the comic began, it's given me the opportunity to meet many individuals that have become good friends and peers. Some have even gone as far as supplying equipment and pointing me toward job opportunities (one of which leading to my current job as an artist at a Disney-owned social media company). Sometimes its a pain to have to keep up with, but I genuinely enjoy it.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I mainly advertise via Project Wonderful, but because this comic features anthropomorphic animals, I also advertise on platforms where such is the focus, FurAffinity being one such place.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Really, I just wanted to tell a story, and invite others to have fun with me as it unfolded. That's pretty much it. I'm not really interested in being internet/regular famous, so if only a handful of people get enjoyment out of reading it, then that's enough for me. If we can have fun together, great! If people find the comic isn't to their taste, that's fine, too.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

Nothing worth mentioning.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Just remember to have fun with your work! If you aren't particularly interested in your own comic, why should you expect anyone else to be? When you enjoy what you do, it shows. Also, if you're going to put your work on a public forum, just be prepared for criticism--both good and bad--and understand that not everyone is going to like what you do. It's perfectly all right, so don't let it bother you. Just keep doing what you do and have a good time!  





Awesome thanks Rhandi! Many people have listed Bone as an inspirational comic. I never got around to reading it but I think I'll have to check it out!

If you dig The Pride of Life you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps The Pride of Life on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading. Let us know whatchya' think with a comment below. Then join in the fight at The Pride of Life!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: The Petri Dish interview

Mac wishes they had invented iBall! Creator John Sutton introduces us to Dr. Euphemism, B.O.B, iBall, and the rest of the crew of his webcomic The Petri Dish!



1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

The Petri Dish is about an enthusiastic -- albeit inept -- genetic engineer who works at a medical sciences company called "Clones R Us". He is assisted by his two biomechanical robots, Bob and iBall ... two of his few successful innovations.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I draw each character and element of the strip separately on white paper using a pencil and a sharpie, and scan them into the computer. I then use Adobe Fireworks to position and resize those elements on each panel of the comic strip, and export the final product to a JPEG.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

I was very inspired by the humour and art of Berke Breathed of Bloom County. Doctor Euphemism's character was loosely inspired by the nerdy character Oliver Wendell Jones in Bloom County. Calvin and Hobbes and The Far Side were also very inspirational. When I'm looking for inspiration for comic strip ideas, I usually take a look at an issue of popular science or some science blogs. Often everyday conversations with friends and co-workers will inspire comic strip ideas that aren't science related.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Some of the side characters are based on my co-workers such as Dr. Andrew Wong the psychologist and Naomi the bike courrier -- but those aren't their jobs in real life. Some elements of Doctor Euphemism's life are similar to my life -- to give me some basis to write about -- but otherwise he is a complete fabrication.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I think Billy Crystal would make a good voice for Doctor Euphemism, and Bill Murray would be excellent for Bob. I hear Jack McBrayer's voice in my head ('Kenneth' the page boy from 30 Rock) whenever I draw iBall.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

"She Blinded me with science" by Thomas Dolby

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

For a long time I've been looking for a creative outlet that wouldn't break the bank or take up too much room in the house. I love to laugh and be silly, and make other people laugh ... so I guess the overall goal is to make at least one person smile, even if it's just me. :-)

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

When doing my research, I heard many artists recommend setting a reasonable posting schedule and sticking to it, no matter what. I decided to set up a posting schedule that I could reasonably stick to, and so far I haven't missed a deadline. I talk about the comic strip to many people, and I get some interesting reactions.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

Right now I have a Facebook Fan Page for The Petri Dish, and I have done a little advertising with Facebook. I try to connect with other well-established artists to submit fan art and guest strips. I have listed my comic strip with several indexing sites, such as Comic Rocket, Top Web Comics and Ink Outbreak. I've had a lot of success with a new index site called 'Just the First Frame', which posts the first frame of hundreds of comic strips each time they post a strip. And of course I talk about The Petri Dish with anyone who will listen. Most people are happy to support my hobby by dropping by to give it a read.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Honestly, apart from the cost of the web-hosting and domain name, a few bucks for pencils and pens and paper, the strip doesn't cost me much. I've set a reasonable posting schedule of two days a week, and I made sure to get about a 30-strip buffer drawn before I started posting so the time requirement wouldn't be overwhelming. It's rewarding when I show someone a comic strip and they can't suppress a smile or a chuckle or an all out guffaw. But the biggest reward comes from pure creation and seeing my drawing and humour improve over time.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I've done some preliminary drawings and character sketches on another weekly comic strip about an IT support firm set in the future on the other side of the galaxy, but I haven't started drawing any comic strips for it yet. I'll let you know when I start posting them.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

It's really tempting to compare yourself to other established artists and think "Aww, my stuff is crap!!" Understand that the well established artists do that too. Never give up. Draw as often as you can. Talk to everyone about your project and most important, have fun.  





Thanks for taking the time John! Now I am going to have "She Blinded Me With Science" stuck in my head all day. But that's a good thing!

If you dig The Petri Dish you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps The Petri Dish on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks for reading. Give us your opinion with a comment below. Then split your genes and your sides over at The Petri Dish!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Tuesday, November 6, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: The Graveyard Gang interview

What did kids do before video games? Annoy the creatures of darkness! Rich Clabaugh answers our twelve questions about creating his webcomic The Graveyard Gang!



1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

THE GRAVEYARD GANG is about 5 rascals who annoy the creatures of darkness that seem to continually plague their coastal Massachusetts town. Oh and it takes place in the 1930s (I wanted a time where there were NO computers, video games TV, when kids played all day outside). It's kind of like if the LITTLE RASCALS, or OUR GANG as they were originally known, fought monsters, ghosts, witches and Lovecraftian menaces.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

Well I draw the comic in pencil, scan, then do my inking and coloring in ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Yikes! There are so many!!! *L* I am in love with old comic strips especially MICKEY MOUSE, POPEYE, and WASH TUBBS. THE SPIRIT by WILL EISNER is also a HUGE influence, I love how he wrote those stories – He even had stories where the main character (The Spirit) wasn't even in it much at all! I also love Stan Lee and Jack Kirby's stuff, especially The FANTASTIC FOUR. I love they way they built an amazing supporting cast like the Inhumans, The Silver Surfer, and Black Panther. The first 12 issues of The Graveyard Gang will have me building my supporting cast for the Gang, I think it adds so much to the overall story. I could go on forever about influences!

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Hmm, that's a tough one. I suppose the actual OUR GANG kids are in there a bit and I guess they have parts of me thrown in there too, heaven help them! *L*

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

Another toughie! I can only think of actors that are dead, like the kids from those OUR GANG, Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello. Gee talk about living in the past! *L*

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Every time I listen to Vampire Weekend's Contra cd it reminds me of the Gang. They have a real different sound. Especially their Horchata track, the instrumentals are spot on for my Gang!

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

To create a fun entertaining comic book that will be remembered long after I'm gone! I'm trying to write a story that all-ages can enjoy, that doesn't talk down to kids.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

It's been scary! *L* I did my first issue a year ago, had it printed so I could trademark and copyright it. I had a great buffer when I launched in June but working/getting used to the website ate up a lot of my time (and buffer) so now I'm up against it so to speak! I'm going to try and stick to 2 longform comic pages a week as long as I can. I am getting faster, doing my backgrounds having been tripping me up this issue. But it's still so cool to see my stuff up there online! After years of my art being so private to have it out there and have people like it is amazing!

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

Using TWITTER and FACEBOOK mostly. I need to actually make some ads so I can try that too. I've had some fellow webcartoonists blog about me on their sites, which is super flattering and kind!

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

I have SO MANY stories to tell I cannot wait to share them with readers. I still work a day job so I do get frustrated that I can't produce my stuff at a quicker pace. I have my main comic and there are some daily strip ideas I have (with various characters from my comic), there just isn't enough time in the day!

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

Well, I'd love to do some of those daily strips I just mentioned but for now I need to get used to doing my comic on a regular and timely basis.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Draw every day, it's been said many times but it IS true! I draw on my train ride to my day job and I've honed my craft so much! Also, believe in yourself and your comic. I find most people don't ... unless/until you start making some bucks doing it.  





Thanks Rich! I was tempted to post page thirteen with the dead mouse but I'll let the readers find out for themselves :)

If you dig The Graveyard Gang you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps The Graveyard Gang on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading. Let us know whatchya' think with a comment below. Then prepare to snoop and be spooked with The Graveyard Gang!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Space Base 8 interview

This crash test monkey must be indestructible! Creator David Scott Smith gives us an inside look at his webcomic Space Base 8!


1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

My comic strip, Space Base 8, is a gag-a-day style webcomic starring Cargo the Rocket Ship Crash Test Monkey. Cargo lives on a space station called, of course, Space Base 8. His best friend is a shy little robot called Lighthouse, whose head is a big light bulb; he serves as SB8's beacon light. Cargo has a crush on Meela, the Space Base 8's administrator and ambassador. It's obvious to everyone Meela returns Cargo's affections… that is, it's obvious to everyone but Meela herself.

There are lots of jokes about jetpacks, ray guns, robots and rocket ships. The universe of Space Base 8 is a crazy place, and Cargo and his friends try to make sense of it. Which is probably impossible.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I use a combination of real ink on paper and Photoshop to make Space Base 8. Using my iMac and a Wacom tablet, I write the dialog and draw thumbnail sketches at the same time, directly into a comic strip template I have set up in Photoshop. I print this out on legal sized copy paper and use a lightbox to transfer and refine tight pencils onto Borden & Riley #234 Paris Paper for Pens. Then I ink the comic using Zebra Disposable Brush Pens and a Pentel Pocket Brush. I love both of those tools so-o-o much! Then I scan the inks back into Photoshop, add gray tones and color, and I'm done.

Even though I could do it all on the computer, I like to ink with pen and brush. What's more, it's cool to have a physical piece of original art that I could sell someday.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

I have always been a big Star Trek and Star Wars fan, and find plenty of inspiration there. Visually, I take a lot from Mid Century Modern design. I am a fan of fifties and sixties space toys, and steal a lot of ideas from those. I have even started a toy ray gun collection that I have featured on my blog a couple times.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

I originally thought that I was writing Cargo, the main character, as myself, but he quickly evolved into someone very different from myself. After a few years of writing the strip, I think Lighthouse has turned out to be a lot like me. People tell me they think Meela is my wife, but I don't intend to write it that way.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I have some friends whose voices I hear when I write the characters, but no celebrities.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

I like the soundtracks to the old Laurel and Hardy and Little Rascals films. I'd want to use that music with SB8.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

The goal of Space Base 8 is really to give me a creative outlet, and to hone my cartooning skills. I never expect to make any money at it, but if I can that would be nice. Every once in a while I may have an opinion to express, and I'll sneak it in as a joke.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

I spent most of my free time working on Space Base 8. I have gotten burned out on it, and have taken breaks a few times. I am constantly surprised by how much time and effort it takes to make a decent comic strip. I really admire people who can do it well on a regular schedule.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I have advertised on The Webcomics List and joined Ink Outbreak. I get some decent traffic from them. I tried Project Wonderful but didn't get very good results from that. Facebook and Twitter work well, but mostly to remind people who already know the strip to go and read it.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

I do SB8 mostly to see what I can do, and to practice doing it. I love comics strips, and I love comedy. I want to be a creator and not just a consumer of comic strips. I want to write jokes and draw funny pictures. I like to make myself laugh.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I don't have any other projects. What free time I have goes into Space Base 8.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

I would tell everyone to keep learning new stuff. Get interested in something you don't already know about. Expand your knowledge base and skill set. I waited way too long to learn how to ink with a brush, and now I love it more than penciling. I waited way too long to learn how to structure a joke, and now I want to write comedy even more than I want to draw (sometimes). This all makes you a better all-around creator. Being interested makes you and your work interesting.  





Thanks so much for taking the time Dave! I'll definitely be picking up Space Base 8 book 1 BLAST OFF!

If you dig Space Base 8 you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Space Base 8 on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks for reading Folks! Drop us a comment below to let us know what ya' think. Then hitch a simian space flight over to Space Base 8!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Saturday, October 27, 2012

Ray Guns! Robots! Rockets!

David Scott Smith creator of the awesome webcomic Space Base 8 (who we will interview this Wednesday) has a feature on his blog called Ray Guns! Robots! Rockets! He was kind enough to post my submission for a space colony transport. Give it a gander and I bet you'll stick around the Space base 8 site exercising your gut laughter muscles!

-Mat
www.evanyeti.com

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Clockworks interview

A steampunk Savage Worlds adventure in webcomic form! Shawn Gaston discusses creating Clockworks!





1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

Clockworks is a steampunk fantasy adventure, following a group of Private Constables in Clorencia City as they deal with anarchists, masked villains, government agents, a mage with a clockwork arm and an army of robots, a mysterious black steel device, and more. It's also a Role-Playing Game setting, due out as a Savage Worlds setting in 2013.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

All the line art starts by hand, using mostly Sharpie markers and pens on sketch pads, then I scan it in and color everything, create all the backgrounds, and do all of the lettering in Photoshop.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Thousands. Everything I've ever enjoyed or everything that's ever struck me in some way. Major influences on Clockworks include Fritz Lang's Metropolis, old Final Fantasy games, most everything Neil Gaiman has ever done, and so on and so forth.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

No, yes, sort of. Clockworks is a sometimes loose retelling of our tabletop RPG campaign, so the events are all based characters my friends created and things that happened while we played the game. So there's some of my friends' personalities in each of the main characters. Additionally, I've drawn some Clockworks fans or friends in as cameos or background characters from time to time.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I've never really thought about it.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Why, I'm actually working on a soundtrack for the Clockworks tabletop RPG. It will be released for free via Creative Commons and it's entirely created of tracks built by remixing songs by musicians who have released their music via Creative Commons. So it will end up being a mix of Nine Inch Nails, Unwoman, Beats Antique, Ad·ver·sary.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

To tell the best adventure story that's ever been told, to create the greatest anything ever. I probably won't hit that, but I like to aim high.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

It's been a lot of work, but it's also brought my art and this world to the attention of a lot of people who wouldn't have otherwise seen it. I can safely say that Clockworks has brought me paid gigs and opportunities that I never would have had otherwise.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I run Project Wonderful ads, I'm a member of Rampage Network, I have a Facebook fan page, I sometimes answer interviews from random yetis. The usual.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Sheer bullheaded determination? A desire to tell this story and share this world with people? A love of adoration and ego stroking fans? Being too stupid to know better? A burning need for some sort of creative output? Most likely some combination of all of the above.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

First and foremost, the Clockworks RPG setting. My plan is to write the entire manuscript before I launch the Kickstarter for it, so people don't have to wait on me writing it. The Kickstarter will pay for more art, editing, layout, maybe some additional writing, and of course printing and publishing. I'm hoping to launch it in late January or February. The entire thing will be open via Creative Commons, and I'm writing it in public. You can view the entire in progress manuscript on Google Drive, and give feedback/join in the progress on Facebook. 

I was also the sole illustrator for the recently published RPG setting Streets of Bedlam, by Jason Blair and Fun Sized Games. It's an ultraviolent neo noir setting for Savage Worlds (noting a trend here?) and I'm extremely proud of it.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Just keep making stuff. Go out there and write and draw and don't stop. Keep pushing yourself to be better, not in terms of sales numbers or page views, but just in how well you do the thing you do.  





Thanks Shawn! Looks like you're keeping very busy. I love the idea of being able to role play a webcomic!

If you dig Clockworks you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Clockworks on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks everyone for reading. Let us know what you think with a comment below. Then begin your adventure over at Clockworks!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Monster Isle interview

What do giant monsters do in their time off? Creator Joey Weiser answers this and other questions in his webcomic Monster Isle!




1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

Monster Isle is about the day-to-day life of giant monsters living on an island together. It’s about their life when they aren’t destroying cities or fighting the Anti-Monster Task Force.

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I draw the strip on bristol with blue pencil, and ink with a brush and crowquill pens. I color and format the comic in Photoshop. There is a walk-through of how I drew a page of my graphic novel Cavemen in Space linked from my webpage, which has a more in-depth list of materials and things like that. It’s pretty much the same process for Monster Isle.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Monster Isle is inspired by Japanese movie and TV monsters, also known as “kaiju.” I take a lot of influence from the Godzilla, Gamera, and Ultraman series in particular. Other than that, comic strips that I love like Peanuts and Calvin & Hobbes have a lot of influence on my work in the strip.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

A lot of the ideas for my strips come from real life, but there isn’t any specific character based on anyone in my life.

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

No, I’m real bad at remembering actors and stuff like that. I would be a terrible casting director.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Even though the action and drama is pretty light in Monster Isle, I think it would be awesome if the great Godzilla music composed by Akira Ifukube could score Gary and the gang’s lives.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

Honestly, Monster Isle is pretty goal-free. I purposefully keep it low-stress in order to just have fun and create some work that hopefully others enjoy. It started as a strip in a local paper, but I haven’t pursued print for Monster Isle very heavily because I’d like to just keep it as a fun side-project.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

Monster Isle is weekly, and I typically take one week a month to work on all four strips for the upcoming month. Before I know it, my buffer it gone and it’s time to work on more strips… It certainly has made me very aware of the passage of time!

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

Like I said, I keep Monster Isle pretty stress-free, so I don’t really worry too much about advertising the strip. Whenever I put a new strip up I’ll post about it on Facebook and Twitter. Also, I’ve started making mini-comics to have at comic conventions, which I suppose serve as an advertisement for the strip.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Well, I love comics! I love making them and I love knowing that people are reading and enjoying the work that I’ve made. Doing a webcomic is a great way to stay productive and also to keep giving people something new of mine to see on a regular basis while I work in secret on my other projects.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I have a new graphic novel coming in February from Oni Press! Mermin Volume 1: Out of Water is the first in a series of graphic novels about a fish-boy who is found washed up on the beach by some human kids. It’s a full-color, hardcover book that collects the Mermin mini-comic issues, with additional scenes and some changes to the pages of the original series. I’m currently working on volume 2, so there hopefully won’t be too long of a wait between books!

I have also been working a lot for SpongeBob Comics recently. Over the next year I’m going to have a lot of work in their monthly comic book, some comics written by me and drawn by other artists as well as comics that I’ve written, drawn, and colored myself!

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Draw and write as much as you can! Draw draw draw! And if you really want to make comics, make sure you finish the work you start! I suggest starting small with short stories or strips for the web or mini-comics, giving yourself something to work towards, finish, and move on. The more you make, the better you will become! 





Thanks for taking the time Joey! I'll be looking for the Mermin graphic novel in February!

If you dig Monster Isle you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Monster Isle on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading! Drop us a comment to let us know what you think. Then ride a pterodactyl on over to Monster Isle!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Nightmare Pro Wrestling interview

It's good to have a werewolf in your corner! Creator Jon David Guerra tackles our twelve questions about Nightmare Pro Wrestling!



1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

The comic is about pro wrestling monsters competing to become the NPW Champion. The main story line follows a young monster named Grave and his tag-team partner Lobo (a cowardly werewolf) as they have fun and hone their wrestling skills

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I started out penciling the comic in sketchbooks but the last couple of years I've gone all digital just to save time. It's a lot faster and makes it easier to experiment. So now I draw everything first in Photoshop, Ink in Illustrator, and then do colors in a program called ArtRage.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Classic Looney Tunes cartoons definitely inspire my comic, especially the Chuck Jones ones. I love the creativity and the fun atmosphere they are able to create in such short skits. As for artists I'd have to say Bill Wray, Jim Smith, and John K for the shapes in their character designs and Mike Mignola for atmosphere. French artists Fabian Mense, Bill Otomo, and Gobi have also had a big influence on my character designs and I'm amazed at how they're able to get so much action and movement into one panel. I also always go to directors Guillermo Del Toro and Hayao Miyazaki when I need a little creative boost.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Not really, though a lot of their motivations from personal experience (like Grave's love of pumpkin empanadas).

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I wouldn't mind seeing it animated or having it animated through stop motion would be really cool. I never really thought of who would voice the characters if that happened but here's my dream cast. I say dream because I'm including dead people on this list. Grave: A young 'Back to the Future' Michael J. Fox. Lobo:Maybe Zach Braff? Grim: Christian Bale, the crazier the Bale the better. Dr. Nightmare: The great Vincent Price. Devastator Dragon: Let's go with Frank Welker doing something similar to the original Megatron voice. Dorian Morbid: Bela Lugosi. Victor Monstor: Boris Karloff, of course but he would have to speak spanish. The Beast: Peter Lorre. Britney Nightmare: Emma Watson. Luna: Emma Stone. Mr. Hyde: Lets get Robbie Coltrane.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

Hmmm...Probably a heavy mix of classic Halloween songs like Children's Day At The Morgue by Sheldon Allman, Jam at the Mortuary by Griz Green, and anything by Tarantula Ghoul. Along with a score by John Carpenter. I'd also throw in a few modern bands like The Birthday Massacre, Trust, and State of the Union.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

I want anybody to be able to drop in and have a spooky fun time in the NPW universe.

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

It's made me happy. It's the first time I have a job that I don't hate doing. I get up in early in the mornings excited to get to work. I think it's also helped me be more disciplined with my time. In order to get everything I need to and want to do I've learned to use my time wisely.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I go to a lot of conventions. I planning on going to even more next year. I also do my best to create a lot of content and post it on various social media outlets like Twitter, Deviantart, Tumblr, and Facebook.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

love doing do it. However, I don't pursue it selfishly. Family and friends stillcome first. What's the point of doing it if you don't have loved ones to share it with?

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I've got a few other stories on the back burning but my projects are pretty much all about NPW. I'm working on making art prints of some of my favorite movies. Right now I'm finishing up a print based on The Cabin in the Woods movie. I've also been messing with doing some animation for NPW. Just trying out a few things in Adobe, nothing big...yet.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Start now! The sooner you start the sooner you'll start growing as a creator. The best way to learn about something and get better at it is by doing it--so don't worry about if you're good at drawing, or if your story is good, or any of that. Just get started and learn as you go.





Awesome thanks Jon! Guillermo Del Toro and Hayao Miyazaki are definitely in my top ten favorite directors of all time!

If you dig Nightmare Pro Wrestling you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Nightmare Pro Wrestling on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks for reading! Let us know what ya' think with a comment below. Then elbow drop over to Nightmare Pro Wrestling to see who reigns supreme!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Web Artist Wednesday: Lilith Dark interview

This fearless warrior battles the evils of bath time! Welcome to the world of Charles Dowd's brave battle-ready girl Lilith Dark!




1. For the poor souls not already reading, please give a brief synopsis of your comic.

Lilith Dark is about a little girl who likes to pretend that she's a D&D type of warrior who fights monsters. Most of the time her imagination gets a little carried away, and instead of fighting monsters, it turns out she's actually just fighting with the family dog, or her big brother Dewey. That is until she discovers a tree full of real monsters just across the street!

2. What materials and/or software do you use?

I'm trained in most traditional art materials, but for Lilith Dark I'm pretty much 100% digital. I do all of the penciling & inking in Manga Studio with a Wacom drawing tablet, and I do all of the painting in Photoshop.

3. Are there any books, movies, toys, artists, or authors that have inspired or continue to inspire your comic?

Lilith Dark is a celebration of all the stuff I was exposed to as a kid. I'm drawing inspiration from all of those classic 80's fantasy and horror films like The Neverending Story, Legend, The Dark Crystal, Evil Dead, and The Gate. Jim Henson's work has always been a huge influence on me, especially his dramatic works like Labyrinth and The Storyteller series.

4. Are any of your characters based on real people in your life?

Lilith & Dewey are really just caricatures of my kids, at least visually. Some of the stuff they do, and the way they get along with one another are definitely reflected in the characters. Honestly though, that's as close to reality as they get. Lilith for example is really based more on myself as a kid. I was out crawling around in sewers and chasing down ice cream trucks on my bike. There was always an adventure!

5. Are there any actors you know you would want to play or voice certain characters in a movie of your comic?

I'd love to see Lilith Dark played by someone like Maria Lark. Maria may be a little old at this point, but she's the type that would really fit the roll.

6. What songs would you like in a soundtrack of your comic?

I've always imagined Lilith Dark to have a punk rock & metal soundtrack. I'd love for Lilith Dark the Movie to feature classics like Danzig and Slayer, and some current bands like Arch Enemy & Cradle of Filth. Bikini Kill's Rebel Girl would be the theme song. That would be awesome.

7. What is your overall goal for your comic?

The ultimate goal of Lilith Dark is to prove to the comic industry that you can make a comic book that's safe for kids to read, that stars a little girl, and people will like it and want to spend money on it. Publishers just don't seem to be into taking a risk these days, so it's just super heroes and licensed characters doing the same things over and over again. Time to shake things up a little!

8. How has managing a comic impacted your life?

It's a ton of work. I do everything myself. I'm the writer, artist, CEO, marketing dept, treasurer, and secretary. It takes a lot of time and sacrifice. I don't get to go out every weekend, or come home at night and veg out on the couch. I have to keep making more comics. Don't get me wrong, I love it, and it's a fun job, but it's a job, and that means work. Thankfully I have an extremely loving and supporting family that puts up with my late night comic making.

9. What do you do to advertise your work?

I buy ads a couple of times a year, I go to cons all the time. The best thing to do is to be available to talk with your readers, either on social media or in person. Word of mouth is still king. If you're a nice guy, people don't mind helping to spread the word. That's the best way to get your work out there in my opinion.

10. Web comics can be very time consuming and sometimes expensive to keep up. Often there is little reward in regards to money and sometimes public attention. Why do you do it?

Well Mat, maybe you're doing it wrong because I've found that I make tons of money and am wildly successful. Oh wait, none of that's true at all!I do it because I love it. It's in my blood. I'm compelled top create. If I wasn't working on Lilith Dark and my other projects, I honestly don't know what I'd be doing. Maybe watching Honey Boo Boo and eating Ding Dongs. I happen to think creating comics is more fulfilling than that though. It's like, who I am.

11. Got any other projects we should know about?

I just finished being a part of a horror anthology called Winter's Eye. I did the cover art, and illustrated a short story written by Martin Brandt. That'll be out in print just in time for Halloween. I'm also part of Zazz Comics, along with Joel Poirier of Stripped Comics, John MacLeod of Space Kid!, and Jess Boudrie of Dax and NightMaiden. You can check all of that out at ZazzComics.com. We'll have some great collabs and other stuff coming out in the new year. I'm pretty excited about that. I'm also in the early development stages of a sprawling epic that will knock your socks off when it finally sees the light of day. Look for that hopefully late next year.

12. What advice would you give to aspiring creators?

Get off your @$$ and do it. Sitting around thinking about it won't accomplish anything. This is a new era, and there's literally no excuse why you can't start a comic right now. Get a website and just do it. Marvel and DC are never going to come knocking on your door. You have to do it yourself if you want to break in. Stop making excuses and draw some comics!





Thanks for taking the time Charles! I'd love to see an animated Lilith Dark battling some baddies to Slayer!

If you dig Lilith Dark you can show your love by up-voting the submission for this interview at Reddit Webcomics. Up-voting keeps Lilith Dark on the front page of the webcomic category longer which means more people get to see it!

Thanks again for reading! Drop us a comment to let us know what ya' think. Then dare to join Lilith Dark as she battles a world of monsters as big as her imagination!

-Mat
evanyeti.com

If you would like to be interviewed about your web-comic send an email to evanyeti@yahoo.com titled "interview" with a link to your comic.

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

Hang Tough

Still waiting in some interview answers from more webcomic creators. We'll be back next week. Until then, HANG TOUGH...


-Mat
evanyeti.com